Germans spending more, Dutch spending less

Germans spending more, Dutch spending less

Dutch household consumption was 1.1 percent lower in the third quarter of 2011 than one year previously. German household consumption, on the other hand, grew by 1.2 percent. Compared to the second quarter of 2011, Dutch household consumption was also down, whereas in Germany it grew. The circumstances for household consumption are more favourable in Germany than in the Netherlands.

Statistics Netherlands has published the Consumption Radar since December 2010. This interactive diagram was developed to analyse developments in consumption by Dutch households, using indicators which reflect the labour market, consumer expectations and the development of house prices and share prices. A brief analysis makes clear that the circumstances for household consumption are more favourable in Germany than in the Netherlands. Furthermore, the rise of contractual wages was larger in Germany.

Germans much less pessimistic about labour market
In November, 71 percent of Dutch consumers expected unemployment to increase in the next twelve months, while only 5 percent anticipated a decrease. Dutch consumers have become much more pessimistic about unemployment recently.

The Germans were much less pessimistic; the number expecting unemployment to fall was nearly as high as the number anticipating an increase. The Germans have been less gloomy about unemployment than the Dutch for over one and a half year now. Incidentally, unemployment fell slightly in Germany in the third quarter, while the number of unemployed people rose considerably in the Netherlands.

German manufacturers were also less pessimistic about the labour market than their Dutch counterparts. In November, manufacturers expecting the number of employees to increase in the next three months outnumbered those anticipating a decrease. In the Netherlands, manufacturers anticipated that their workforce would be reduced.

Pin It on Pinterest

Shares